YEAR TWO CURRICULUM

Students are tested to see value relationships with a higher level of sophistication, organise and group these relationships with a more complex strategy.

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ADVANCED CAST DRAWING

Second Year

Advanced Cast Drawing in charcoal relays the principles learned in Beginning Cast Drawing whilst building on them. Students are required to copy two plaster casts, with much more complexity and nuance than the beginning cast drawings.

In order to successfully pass these exercises, students must correctly impress the cast’s outline, shadow shape and proportion to a good standard. They must also skilfully and knowledgeably use their materials. The instructor looks for accuracy in measurement, values and a sense of the form turning in real space.


By the end of Advanced Cast Drawing you will be able to:


Apply the sight-size method of measurement in order to view and reproduce the subject accurately

Demonstrate an ability to compress and organize complex value relationships

Create the impression of depth, distance, and atmosphere among parts of the drawing

Create a realistic impression of structure and solidity Create a realistic impression of light flowing over form

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ADVANCED FIGURE DRAWING

2nd & 3rd Year

By creatively organising values and shapes in unison with anatomical elements, students develop their ability to think as painters.

The figure is at the core of the school’s program. Students work under consistent lighting conditions, drawing from the live model. Models return to the same pose for 12 weeks, 3 hours per day. Longer poses are essential for a fully rendered, complete drawing or painting.

Drawing the figure in charcoal cleverly cements the principles learned during Figure Drawing 101, and builds on them. Charcoal has a wider range of tones and can be used to imply more depth, and so using this medium affords more tools to the student to represent their subject. This provides the student with a more information-dense approach to developing their value relationships, developing drawings with more

Drawing the figure in charcoal cleverly cements the principles learned during figure drawing 101, and builds on them. Charcoal has a wider range of tones and can be used to imply more depth, and so using this medium affords more tools to the student to represent their subject. This provides the student with a more information-dense approach to developing their value relationships, developing drawings with more sophistication and strategy. Specifically students are pushed to see specific half tone shapes and group them effectively, in order to achieve a unified and structured drawing.

Students attend life drawing classes for three hours a week outside of their long poses. There are many of these evenings running throughout the week at the studio. Pencil drawing solidifies the importance of learning to reproduce, in an accurate manner, the subjects contour and shadow shapes. Students are encouraged to use only line and one value in their shadow shapes, creating a two-value structure to their drawings. The outcome is a flat even shadow with an indication of the outside edge of their subject. Pencil drawings allow the student to understand just how much information one can gain about their subject with very little indication on the page. Students must, however, be accurate with regard to proportion, structure, and gesture on a very small scale. 

By the conclusion of Advanced Figure Drawing you will be able to:


Use a method of measurement in order to view and reproduce the subject accurately

Demonstrate an ability to compress and organise value relationships

Demonstrate an understanding of human anatomy by a sophisticated outline and well designed shadow shapes.

Demonstrate skill in dealing with the subtle changes and movement of the living form and the light

Create the impression of form turning in space

Create a realistic impression of weight and balance

Create a realistic impression of structure and solidity

Create a realistic impression of light flowing over form

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INTRODUCTION TO FIGURE PAINTING

2nd Year
Students are afforded a limited palette, this allows them to explore a more expansive toolset, including hue and chroma as well as value.
During this unit, students focus on tone and work in a structured curriculum of grisaille, limited palette and full palette. A figure painting when properly successful utilises all of the skills and abilities learned in the previous units. The student is instructed to paint the figure in grisaille firstly. Raw umber or burnt umber and white on a canvas which has been suitably toned down. Here the student learns to reproduce the correct value structure in paint, a natural progression from charcoal. In the student’s limited palette, the student can focus on value, crucial to effective modelling, simplifying the number of colours helps the student mix these values precisely.

Students at SSCA begin working with paint as soon as possible through their master-study projects. Controlling the paint and working with chroma, we find, does not become any easier the longer you are required to wait to use it. Because of this we find our students are better equipped to handle the transition from working with dry mediums to paint when this stage is introduced. Students are introduced to painting techniques, the properties of pigments, oils, vanishes and the proper use of mediums. Students are also instructed in how to build and prepare their own canvases and grounds. 

During all of these processes students are given ample time to study with the live model, they may experiment and gather knowledge to inform their practice.



By the end of Introduction to figure painting the student will be able to: 



Successfully combine their drawing knowledge with the process of applying paint

Demonstrate a control and organization of the materials (oil and canvas)

Achieve a sense of reality using values and temperature shifts when working in grisaille and limited palette

Produce accurate color-values, sense of light, atmosphere and space

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INTRODUCTION TO PAINTING

2nd Year, 1st Year


Students begin to study painting in-depth. Having familiarised themselves to a degree with their master-study projects, they attend technical demonstrations concerning palette-building and paint mixing. 


During this unit, students concentrate on values (tones). They work through their grisaille projects, limited palette and eventually the full palette our instructors use.


Students create painted renders of plaster casts in grisaille, using ivory black, raw umber and white on a canvas which has been toned down from white. Students learn to replicate the value structures created in charcoal with paint. Value-keying is of particular importance here, students reduce the number of colours, this helps them concentrate on getting the correct tonal values.

Grisaille is a monochromatic painting. It separates hue (colour) and chroma (colour intensity) from the process of painting, it is a logical progression from the process of drawing. It doesn’t necessarily need to done be black and white, it is an excellent preparation for working in colour. Post-grisaille, tonal painting with limited hues builds on this process. Introducing colour and temperature in an easy to absorb fashion. Students are often stunned by the amount of hues one can produce with limited pigments at this stage, the palette serves as a base from which to explore the expanding degrees of complexity a painting can have.


Students at SSCA begin working with paint as soon as possible through their master-study projects. Controlling the paint and working with chroma, we find, does not become any easier the longer you are required to wait to use it. Because of this we find our students are better equipped to handle the transition from working with dry mediums to paint when this stage is introduced. Students are introduced to painting techniques, the properties of pigments, oils, vanishes and the proper use of mediums. Students are also instructed in how to build and prepare their own canvases and grounds. 


By the end of “Introduction to Painting” the student will be able to:


Successfully apply drawing skills to the painting medium technique

Correctly draw the subject’s outline, proportion and shadow shape

Skilfully and fluently use their materials.

Achieve a sense of reality using values and temperature when working in limited and full palette

Produce accurate color-values, drawing, sense of light, atmosphere and space 

LEARN ABOUT OUR YEAR 3 CURRICULUM